Peaks Island Press

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Feed your muse: plenty of inspiration awaits in Maine

Explore the Maine Literary Map

Explore the Maine Literary Map

My last post spoke of new beginnings in our literary lives and I’m clinging to that spirit with this piece on New Year inspiration. Since many of the online resources on Peaks Island Press’ Maine Author Resources page had evaporated into cyberspace, I have freshened it up. So feed your muse and meander through resources listed there, for example, the Literary Map of Maine.

Consider how one of the many pinpoints on the Maine map features a four-foot tall porcupine:

Hugh Pine
Janwillem Van de Wetering (1931-2008)

And if you drive the Sorry road often enough, you will see Hugh Pine too.
He still wears his red hat, and he still walks upright, so chances are you
won’t know he is a porcupine and not a little old man with white whiskers
and a long coat.

This 1st title in a series of children’s early readers stars Hugh Pine, a four-foot
tall porcupine, a lovable old codger, and a sage of Sorry Bay. Hugh has many
amusing adventures while looking for the meaning of life. The Dutch born
author was world famous for his adult mystery thrillers and lived in Surry, Maine.

A porcupine who dresses as a man to safely cross the road

A porcupine who dresses as a man to safely cross the road

Doesn’t that inspire you to either read more about Hugh Pine, create your own character, or drive to Surry, Maine?  By the way, Surry’s municipal website provides a helpful tip on how to deter bears from your backyard during their mating season by hanging peanut butter-smeared tinfoil on your electric fence. Really. I don’t think I could make that up.

Alternatively, visit the Maine Crime Writers’ blog and feed your paranoia as you shove blocks of wood into your hungry woodstove:
“There’s a malevolence to a Maine winter, too, the lethal edge of bitter cold and icy water. Go down in the snow on a sub-zero night–injured, drunk, disoriented–and there’s a good chance you won’t get up. Go down in a snowstorm and there’s a good chance you won’t be found, not before April.”
So walking porcupines and death-by-snowbank lurk in the resources that I have assembled for you. Go forth and seize the new year with a sense of literary adventure.

Homemaking, Snowbabies, and the Search for the North Pole: Josephine Diebitsch Peary and the Making of National History

North by Degree

North by Degree

After crossing Casco Bay by ferry, packages are delivered to islanders by the taxi driver. This week, I found a package on my doorstep and hurried it inside, just as a rainstorm hit the island. I was thrilled to find that it  contained a copy of the newly-published book “North by Degree: New Perspectives on Arctic Exploration” (Lightning Rod Press, American Philosophical Society) that includes my article “Homemaking, Snowbabies, and the Search for the North Pole: Josephine Diebitsch Peary and the Making of National History.”

Josephine Diebitsch Peary

Josephine Diebitsch Peary

Since 2007, Peaks Island Press has offered its readers a glimpse of the daily lives, inspirations, and publications of the many authors who call Peaks Island home. Once in a great while, I turn the spotlight on myself and share something about my own writing process or publications. “Homemaking, Snowbabies, and the Search for the North Pole” started with a conference presentation that I gave at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia in 2008 where an amazing assemblage of speakers gathered to bring new perspective to the history of Arctic exploration. The timing was very meaningful as 2008 was the centennial of Robert E. Peary’s 1908-09 North Pole Expedition and it was also the fourth International Polar Year. I was honored to be invited to share my research: an account of Robert Peary’s quest for the North Pole through the eyes of his wife, Josephine. Here’s an excerpt from the article to give you a sense for the story:

Patricia Erikson in Greenland, researching Josephine Peary

Patricia Erikson in Greenland, researching Josephine Peary

“The notoriously deadly and tragic outcomes of many prior Arctic expeditions had made the idea of taking a woman, more specifically a white woman, to the Arctic seem ridiculous to the American public in the 1890s. In 1891, three years after their marriage, Josephine embarked on her first of several Arctic expeditions with Robert Peary. She did this despite public criticism that the expedition was too dangerous for her and in spite of the male expedition members who resented her presence and what they called her “scandalously short” traveling costume. (Erikson, p. 266).

I don’t believe my research travels ever involved a scandalously short traveling costume, but I did a fair amount of retracing Josephine’s footsteps before I wrote about her. That journey included interviewing Peary family members, visiting the Peary cottage at Eagle Island, diving into the archives at the Maine Women Writers Collection (UNE), at Bowdoin College, and at Dartmouth College, and traveling to Qaanaaq, Greenland to gather oral history from Inuit peoples whose ancestors played crucial roles in the Peary expeditions. I’ll share more about these adventures for those of you who love research, non-fiction, and travel.

In the meantime, if you’d like to read some of my writing about the Peary family, you can check out the following that are available online:

Walk with Laima Vince and discover the inspiration for “The Ghost in Hannah’s Parlor”

Come walk with Laima Vince

Are you a literary tourist? Let Laima Vince be your guide

Laima Vince’s passion for Peaks Island led her to write “The Ghost in Hannah’s Parlor.” This middle reader novel starts one night in November on Captain’s Island when a nine-year-old named Hannah goes downstairs for a glass of water. The adventure begins when Hannah meets the ghost of Hilda De Witt Rose, a turn-of-the-century opera star who lives in a rose in Hannah’s parlor wallpaper along with an entire ghost cast of the opera Carmen.

Now you can discover Vince’s inspiration for this children’s book by walking with her tomorrow — to Snake Alley and to where the famous Gem once stood — Friday, July 11th, starting from the Peaks Island branch of the Portland Public Library at 12:30 pm.

How do I get to Peaks Island?

What is Peaks Island Press?

Pages of Peaks: Calling all Peaks Island authors

Poster for Color & Pages of Peaks event

Poster for Color & Pages of Peaks event

Peaks Island authors are invited to participate in a popular, annual event at the beautiful, historic Trefethen-Evergreen Improvement Association (TEIA) on Diamond Passage, an event formerly known as the Color of Peaks Art Show and fundraiser for camperships. This year the event has expanded to include books and has become the “Color & Pages of Peaks Artist & Author” Show from July 12th to 13th.

The Show will commence with a wine-and-cheese opening reception on Friday evening, July 12th from 6-8:00 PM; bring an appetizer to share and come prepared to enjoy music by Heather Thompson and Sam Saltonstall. The show continues the next day on Saturday, July 13th from 8 AM to 2 PM.

Authors are asked to pre-register for this book exhibit, to drop off their books by July 11th, and to pick up their books by 3 PM on the 13th. Co-organizers Friends of Peaks Island Library and Friends of TEIA will charge a 10% commission on all book sales. For more information or to secure a registration form, authors should please contact Kathryn Moxhay at kmoxhay@earthlink.net.

If you’re an island author, you know it never hurts to network in marketing your books. If you’re a literary tourist, then you won’t want to miss seeing Peaks Island as an inspiration for countless authors. For the past 8 years, this has been one of the best feel-good events of the summer and the one with the best view, so don’t miss it!

Sailing at TEIA (courtesy of http://teiaclub.org)

Sailing at TEIA (courtesy of http://teiaclub.org)

How do I get to Peaks Island?

Who is Patricia Erikson? – I’m an author, educator, and consultant who lives on Peaks Island in Casco Bay, Maine and blogs at Peaks Island Press to keep up with the many writers whose talent and joie de vivre make this island community an amazing place. I’m also a history geek who blogs at Heritage in Maine.

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