Peaks Island Press

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Archive for Maine Crime Writers

Treat Yourself this Halloween to James Hayman’s “The Girl in the Glass”

The Girl in the Glass by James Hayman

The Girl in the Glass by James Hayman

Brittle leaves rattled around outside and scratched against the glass door of Longfellow Books in Portland. A group of bibliophiles, many of them writers themselves, listened to James Hayman channel Poe. This wasn’t poetry though, it was a reading from the latest in his murder mystery series set in Portland, Maine: The Girl in the Glass. Read the rest of this entry »

Jim Hayman: Looking back at the island

fullmoonferry

Full moon hovers over ferry and loading ramp

What makes an island community gasp, collectively? When an islander sells their dream house or cottage and becomes — cough — a mainlander. Author Jim Hayman has made that plunge (pardon the pun), but, in his parting, he shares what it’s like to weed some 1000 books out of his family’s library and transport them across the harbor by ferry. Read his post, “A Moving Experience,” published on the Maine Crime Writers site, one of the author resources listed here at Peaks Island Press.

Peaks Island Press offers behind-the-scenes glimpses of a vibrant, literary community perched on Peaks Island, two miles off the coast of the beautiful and award-winning city of Portland, Maine. If you haven’t already, you may subscribe in the upper right corner at http://www.peaksislandpress.com.

Feed your muse: plenty of inspiration awaits in Maine

Explore the Maine Literary Map

Explore the Maine Literary Map

My last post spoke of new beginnings in our literary lives and I’m clinging to that spirit with this piece on New Year inspiration. Since many of the online resources on Peaks Island Press’ Maine Author Resources page had evaporated into cyberspace, I have freshened it up. So feed your muse and meander through resources listed there, for example, the Literary Map of Maine.

Consider how one of the many pinpoints on the Maine map features a four-foot tall porcupine:

Hugh Pine
Janwillem Van de Wetering (1931-2008)

And if you drive the Sorry road often enough, you will see Hugh Pine too.
He still wears his red hat, and he still walks upright, so chances are you
won’t know he is a porcupine and not a little old man with white whiskers
and a long coat.

This 1st title in a series of children’s early readers stars Hugh Pine, a four-foot
tall porcupine, a lovable old codger, and a sage of Sorry Bay. Hugh has many
amusing adventures while looking for the meaning of life. The Dutch born
author was world famous for his adult mystery thrillers and lived in Surry, Maine.

A porcupine who dresses as a man to safely cross the road

A porcupine who dresses as a man to safely cross the road

Doesn’t that inspire you to either read more about Hugh Pine, create your own character, or drive to Surry, Maine?  By the way, Surry’s municipal website provides a helpful tip on how to deter bears from your backyard during their mating season by hanging peanut butter-smeared tinfoil on your electric fence. Really. I don’t think I could make that up.

Alternatively, visit the Maine Crime Writers’ blog and feed your paranoia as you shove blocks of wood into your hungry woodstove:
“There’s a malevolence to a Maine winter, too, the lethal edge of bitter cold and icy water. Go down in the snow on a sub-zero night–injured, drunk, disoriented–and there’s a good chance you won’t get up. Go down in a snowstorm and there’s a good chance you won’t be found, not before April.”
So walking porcupines and death-by-snowbank lurk in the resources that I have assembled for you. Go forth and seize the new year with a sense of literary adventure.
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